The Maintenance Man: Fata-nomics the cancer plaguing healthcare

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July 13, 2015 | 11 Comments

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  1. There is a wonderful book by Joe Dumit on these issues – Drugs for Life. This is a phrase that can be read two ways – taking Drugs to Save a Life – or taking Drugs for Life to save Drug Companies

    As in the Martian cookbook – Human Cooking

    David

  2. He did murder and disable and torture. I doubt he’d be safe on the street so he might as well buck up and meet his new friends. There are many mental illnesses ascibed to patients, like hypochondria, malingering, factitious, etc. Are there any for doctors? There is symptom-dismissing, complaint-mocking, reckless prescribing (pharmamania), and relief-withholding (sadism) which in the neurotic realm, I think. This guy seems like a non-florid psychotic.

    The article could have been about chemopsychiatry: “He told people with benign conditions that they had life-threatening MENTAL DISORDERS. He told people with hopeless cases that he could cure them.”

    The inventor of Maintenance Chemopsychiatry
    But his signature scam may have been the idea of “Maintenance Chemopsychiatry.” Over and over, patients testified that (Lieberman?) told them their mood disorder, thought disorder, or anxiety would come back unless they submitted to long-term chemopsychiatry– often, for the rest of their lives.

  3. http://www.investorschronicle.co.uk/2015/07/10/shares/sectors/the-big-four-in-big-pharma-wJ1B854AwkHMHEk6S5GKaN/article.html

    Whilst some of us cooked from the inside out, it can be useful to read the overview as to where the various pharmaceutical companies sit within their industry.

    The strategies and tactics employed by companies, such as, GlaxoSmithKline either put a smile on your face as there is a forecast that the low share price might mean Witty might go or it might be more interesting to see how Hampton, new Chairman, formerly, RBS, steers his new ship starting September.

    Actually, I would prefer Witty sits tight and hangs on to his very long career and knighthood and delivers GSK to the fate they deserve as aspiring chieftains in the highly competitive world of all those pills and injections…..

    Amazing story, Johanna; we have one, too……….:)

  4. One issue I didn’t raise yet: The big push for depot injections in “early psychosis”. In the course of my research I confirmed something kind of chilling: Antipsychotic injections are Part B, Buy-and-Bill, just like chemo.

    New injections like Abilify Maintena and Invega Sustenna run as high as $1500. With $90 markup and 10% bulk discount for a busy clinic, that could be $240 per monthly shot. Overworked community clinics may get $30 or less from Medicare for a brief check-in visit, and their state funding is being slashed to ribbons. They may come to depend on injections just to keep them alive. $30, or $270? You tell me.

    Here’s how Otsuka Pharmaceutical is spending on doctors right now:

    https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/company/otsuka-america-pharmaceutical-inc/

  5. I have just discovered this website and the many intelligent reporters, commenters, and medical scientists interacting here — Where have you all been? You are singing my song about the American Medical profession’s criminal complicity in normalizing the concept of maintenance drugging. As a former SA professional, I have to say I believe it is an actual manifestation of Addiction in the mind of the Prescriber to follow the herd on this, and therefore as always, I demand personal as well as professional accountability. America is a nation of impaired adult children who have lost the capacity to think independently, question authority, feel what we feel, and solve personal problems. This inability to function in an adequate adult capacity is the root cause for why we are collectively unable to deal with Reality.
    This lack of attendance is killing us in many different ways. The life-changing, life-saving solution is always to look into the mirror first. Then we will be equipped to tackle saving the world.

  6. This somewhat reminds me of an experience my mother had with a glaucoma specialist. My mother, 94, but still quite functional, spent the winter months in Florida, as she has for last 20 years, although most with my father also. So she gets a whole new set of doctors in the winter, and the glaucoma specialist was new because my mother didn’t have this problem before. Unlike her specialist at home, this doctor was having my mother come in every 2 weeks or so, to “make sure her pressure didn’t go up”. Well, her numbers were fine but the doctor kept on insisting that she’d like to get the numbers lower but couldn’t seem to. She was suggesting that maybe laser surgery (the next step after drops don’t work and that’s where the money is) would be the solution. My mother kept putting her off saying if a problem happened she had no family around and was worried. Eventually she came home and her regular doctor told her that her retina? was too thin and wouldn’t do laser surgery because she might bleed and lose her sight entirely. I don’t think I’m being too cynical when I look at this and think the doctor was only chasing money. After all the medications probably bring in nothing. I wonder how many surgeries that doctor actually does compared to most in that field. Of course, being in Florida is a potential gold mine.

  7. There must bea few other totally dysfunctional doctors currently in practice.So what else is new?Itis amazing that ,as far as I know,there are never any comments about the epidemic of wellness practitioners,such as n aturopaths,chiropractors,massage therapists etc.I have seen many patients who were being”treated” by these quacks,who missed the real cause of their problem.The last one had severe back paon

  8. Sorry for the mess up.He was treated for back pain for six months before I saw him urgently for worsening of his pain.He also noted loss of powerin his left leg.Short story he had metastatic prostate cancer.I asked him if he would sue the chiropractor,and he never gave it a thought!

  9. Noel Hershfield appears to bemoan “wellness practitioners”, yet I would pick one of them every time, as compared to such as psychiatrists – one of whom told me (when I was somewhat sad and sleepless at the end of a love affair) that I had the “family gene” , had chronic depression, and that it would never go away – I needed to take antidepressants for life.
    Fast forward, to years later, off the poisons and feeling fine, just imagine how I feel for being duped. For shame to this profession, and other MDs, for their heartless, damaging, and even criminal behavior. For that is precisely what it is.

  10. How many clinicians practice medicine unethically and never get caught?
    Patients are cash cows.
    They keep adding medicines upon medicines, thinking they are healing.
    They are slowly killing the patients and milking them for every dollar.
    How do you think some patients get Alzheimer disease?
    It is not a genetic disorder it is drug induced.
    There are a long list of diseases that are drug induced.
    I’m staying clear from doctors.
    You never know which one will make you like you have a disease when you don’t?
    Anyone, can play this ‘futile’ game.
    It horrifies me that some clinicians can harm patients and get away with it.
    There is such thing called ‘natural justice’.

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