MAiD in Canada: Treatment Resistant Depression

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February 19, 2021 | 7 Comments

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  1. MAiD and mental illness? This is very dangerous and should not ever be considered. I am even shocked they are even going to debate it! We are living in very scary times. People should not be allowed to make such a decision if mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatments because they may very well feel the opposite when in a changed mental state, ie no longer mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatment.

    Unbelievable this is even up for discussion.

  2. Indeed, mental illness is as real as physical illness however, I question the inaccurate tools of misdiagnosis practitioners have been utilising in an obscure manner, for a limitless amount of time.
    It is certainly unconscionable that anyone could propose such a preposterous debate and even consider cementing it into any form of legislation.
    If someone is mentally impaired especially due to some of the tools practitioners are so underhandedly taking advantage of, how can they put forward such a debacle.
    Some patients are of ‘not sound mind’ when they are under the influence of these medicines particularly when doctors prescribe so many medicines at one given time. It is no different to one who is under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs.
    I am convinced that a proposal of such thoughtless magnitude can certainly bring such dire consequences.
    The right to die under such circumstances is fraught with legal/moral/ethical implications, that is not only open to abuse but misinterpretation.

    Let me put forward a case scenario:
    A patient who comes into a physician’s office, already displaying signs of clinical depression, is prescribed a medicine for their condition. Within a few weeks, the prescribed medication does not work effectively according to plan and so another medication is prescribed to determine its effectiveness. If for some unfortunate reason, the patient ends up ‘mentally’ worse than what they came in with, it can certainly lead to unnecessary suffering and potentially lead to an inexcusable death. The medicine(s) may have put the poor patient into an abysmal ‘gridlock’, through no fault of their own. How can anyone condone such unacceptable psychiatric treatment, such as MAiD, under another unwarranted legislation?
    One cannot possibly use the assumption or paradox to assume the everyone has the right to die under these abhorrent conditions.
    I will not give anyone the right to judge or even utter the words to say it is someone’s choice especially when a case such as the one I mentioned is out of the persons control.
    The above case study, given time and appropriate ways to heal, may have a second chance to life, without unnecessary pain or suffering. This is why practitioners always have to find other less harmful alternatives for patients because the above scenario can happen to anyone. Unless, we use technology wisely to determine if patients are combatable to certain medicines, some practitioners should always err with caution, before prescribing. It’s like a stab in the dark.
    The area of healing mental illnesses, should be explored and exhausted until one finds ‘a compatible fit’ for the individual.
    Healing mental illnesses is not just confined to pills.
    Medicine has come a long way for assisting and helping many with psychiatric disorders however, if these mental illnesses are induced by prescribed medicines there has to be a way to detoxify the patient without harming the brain. Western Medicine has a long way to go before they can achieve this without harming people.
    For this reason, I totally am in agreeance with what Anne-Marie KELLY has so convincingly stated:
    People should not be allowed to make such a decision if mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatments because they may very well feel the opposite when in a changed mental state, ie no longer mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatment.
    I am sure that many people who are conscientious would have no objection to the case I have put forward. If they did, our standards of care and compassion are slowly diminishing and the factors that maintain societal cohesion are coming undone. Society will slowly start to collapse if we allow unethical conditions to make its way into the system.

  3. Some patients are of ‘not sound mind’ when they are under the influence of these medicines particularly when doctors prescribe so many medicines at one given time. It is no different to one who is under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs.

    Exactly being on prescribed psychiatric drugs is no different to being under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs. Why can they not see this obvious fact?

    You can’t be assessed by a psychiatrist or interviewed by the police if your under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs yet they ignore the effects psychiatric drugs have on a person.

    You couldn’t make this up if you tried.

  4. Yes Anne-Marie Kelly, common sense subjects are never debated.
    We are viewed as criminals if we analyse such subjects.
    Too many people are dying through no fault of their own and the current ‘modus operandi’ has to change.

  5. I think we do need to remember that the ones suffering from PSSD etc. or have been told that they fit in to the TRD scenario are, as groups, pushing forwards for MAiD to be made available to them. In their desperation, they see no way out other than death. The CAUSE of their suffering is where we should be aiming our energies, I feel, in an attempt to ensure that they, the present sufferers, WILL BE THE LAST.
    If we merely concentrate on a mode of death then we leave generations to come who will suffer in exactly the same way.
    There are bound to be those who will push for MAiD for these groups – often ones who would probably like all criticisms of prescribed drugs to die alongside the sufferers. It is extremely sad that ANYONE, by doing nothing more than taking a medication as prescribed, has been pushed so far that they can find no joy whatsoever in living.
    I find it interesting that comments, here and on David’s blog, from those who have experienced other adverse effects, are totally against the inclusion of “mental health cases” in assisted death rights. I have checked with my own son, who, as many of you will know, has suffered from prescribed medication adverse effects – he is also TOTALLY against assisted dying in all its forms. He only agrees with palliative support in dying as happens to someone in a vegetative state.

  6. All the love and care and compassion in the world will not alter a profound wish to die All the talking and promises of a better future become futile At the deep end there is little meaningfull attachment to life itself , It is not heartless but people and society are not worth hanging on to compared to the unremitting bleakness of loss of any joy in living or the horror of drug induced loss of identity or the shocking realisation that bizarre drug induced symptoms might never end. Nobody can judge this for another . Many who would want assisted deaths are put off by the bureaucratic mannner being proposed for ending something as sacred as a life. As assisted death is the issue here I would avoid any attempt at my own death being ‘assessed’ in such a vile way that a group of psychs would decide to monitor and decide for me that the time is ripe. The decision for people with mental illnesses can be as rational as anybody elses in times of remission. To put people with mental health histories in yet another category as unable to make that decision denies the same rights as others to excercise autonomy over their own lives. There are better options than medically assisted deaths but neither they or the alternatives are foolproof.
    All Professionals are still not requesting to have a copy of an Advance Decision or advising people to make one – There are some which explain the way to set this out for anyone with a mental health issue , it is worth taking a look at several as they can be a little different and some are specific about advice for people with mental health issues. When an attempt at suicide fails there is still the right to decide on what treatments are not acceptable. Some orgs still oppose the total right to die without certain conditions attached , such as stipultating a wait of so many months rather than leave that to the person making a decision to have an assisted death. To be tossing these things up at all is shocking but To live like a ghost cut off from life is not something everyone wants to tolerate.

  7. Anon, I was in a state of total darkness because of what the meds did to me and yes, I too wanted to die.
    Thank goodness, I did not resort to such dark thoughts or else I wouldn’t be here writing/creating awareness/debating or challenging.
    You have a right to your opinion as others have a right to theirs.
    We have been impacted, have some clarity and insight into what is really going on when meds are misused and abused.
    We understand how it impacts the delicate ‘hard wiring ‘of the brain and we appreciate that once one is able to come out of the ‘dark abyss’ these meds induce, there is indeed, light at the end of the tunnel.
    Once the dark clouds lifted and my mindset changed, life was worth living despite all the health challenges that were and are still are ahead of me.
    Like Anne-Marie KELLY stated:
    People should not be allowed to make such a decision if mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatments because they may very well feel the opposite when in a changed mental state, i.e. no longer mentally impaired or on any psychiatric treatment.
    Drug induced depression does your head in and I cannot justify death as a means to an end.
    People deserve second chances in life and I am so glad I am alive.
    I would love to leave you with a quote because I am sure that many who have pulled through would tend to resonate with it.

    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me.’
    ~ Emma Bombeck
    This is why we come to RXISK because it is our calling, our passion and of course our way of giving back to people who are and were in the same situation that we once were in. We hope that we can prevent misfortunes so that other souls do not have to suffer the way we did. RXISK gives us meaning and purpose to do what we believe is right.

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